About 2040 Vision

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In February 2020 we started to look ahead to what we wanted our city, towns and villages to be like in another 20 years’ time. People across the District shared their views with us on what they already love, and what they want it to be like as a place to live, work and play in 2040.

The last few months have been unprecedented. The covid-19 pandemic, and the impact this has on us all locally, means we now need to move forward differently. Rather than looking towards 2040, our focus now needs to be on our short-medium term recovery, as we start to build back better.

Our consultation on the 2040 Vision has now closed, but everything we have heard over the last few months remains an important input to our strategic planning. This includes the next Council Plan, our economic recovery planning, our response to the climate emergency, and our bid to become the City of Culture in 2025. We will also share a summary of what we've heard on this Hub in the coming weeks.

Thank you to everyone who has participated.





In February 2020 we started to look ahead to what we wanted our city, towns and villages to be like in another 20 years’ time. People across the District shared their views with us on what they already love, and what they want it to be like as a place to live, work and play in 2040.

The last few months have been unprecedented. The covid-19 pandemic, and the impact this has on us all locally, means we now need to move forward differently. Rather than looking towards 2040, our focus now needs to be on our short-medium term recovery, as we start to build back better.

Our consultation on the 2040 Vision has now closed, but everything we have heard over the last few months remains an important input to our strategic planning. This includes the next Council Plan, our economic recovery planning, our response to the climate emergency, and our bid to become the City of Culture in 2025. We will also share a summary of what we've heard on this Hub in the coming weeks.

Thank you to everyone who has participated.



We are no longer monitoring questions submitted on this Hub. A record of questions and answers is provided here for information.

Your questions

  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    What is being planned for the parks as more money is spent on certain parks but less money on other parks in the district I. E Horton Park needs more investment

    Mr Kevin O rourke asked 5 months ago

    Thank you for your email.

    The Council are looking at a significant investment in its parks and open spaces through the Sports Pitch Improvement Program and the Playable Spaces program. The works are to improve sports pitches and facilities across the district as well as improving the play equipment for both children and adults.  Both programs aim to provide a modern sustainable stock of sports facilities and play areas across the district for the benefit of all.

    The investment will be based on a needs assessment and distribution of play areas to provide the maximum availability to communities.  The  assesments for the works will be picked up again as soon as the current restrictions are lifted and funding can be sourced.

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    Why is BMDC so insistent on building a 'Community Hub' on the literal greenfield site in the centre of Keighley at the junction of North Street and Cavendish Street? What function will such a 'Community Hub' have in a post-Covid age when more service functions will operate from home-based offices? Why is it necessary? What organisations will use it? Why can BMDC not understand that the people of Keighley greatly support the concept of 'The Green Space' remaining grassed over, with planted trees and benches, maintained as a Town Centre Park, dedicated to the late Dr Ian Dewhirst?

    Graham Mitchell asked 5 months ago

    The Council is in discussion with a number of potential occupiers of the proposed public sector hub, for relocation of some of their services.  They must observe their own processes for agreeing investment, unfortunately they cannot be identified at this stage owing to commercial confidentiality, however it would be a matter for them to consider if the impact of corona virus will alter their plans. We recognise that some people have suggested retaining the site as an urban park and green space. However it is also the case that using the site for employment has strong backing from the Keighley business community.

    The location is attractive as it is central, close to transport links and the town centre, and the location of significant, well-paid employment on this site would boost footfall in the town centre and help the wider regeneration of Keighley.

    Keighley town centre has a number of open spaces close at hand in the form of the Town Hall Square, Church Green, which has recently been improved with the creation of the Memory Garden, Devonshire Park and Cliffe Castle, which itself had a £4.5m investment secured by the Council.

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    How is Bradford intending to respond to flooding in the district and plan to prevent more flooding in the future?

    JoA asked 5 months ago

    Thank you for your email. 

    Adverse weather is a national concern and the risk of flooding in England is predicted to increase as a result of climate change and development in areas at risk. Flood risk across the Bradford District is varied but caused in the main by overland flow following short, high intensity, or heavy, prolonged rainfall events and/or overtopping rivers and watercourses. There is a history of land and property flooding, the most recent and severe flooding in the district in 15 years being a consequence of Storms Desmond and Eva in 2015 and in February 2020 from Storms Ciara and Dennis. 

     It is important to realise that it is not possible to prevent all flooding, it is inevitable and can occur at any time, however, there are actions that can be taken to manage risk and reduce impact. As Lead Local Flood Authority, the City of Bradford Metropolitan District Council is required under Section 9 of the Flood and Water Management Act 2010, to develop, maintain, apply and monitor a strategy for local flood risk management – a “Local Flood Risk Management Strategy”. The strategy must detail the risk management authorities and the functions that they can exercise within the Bradford Lead Local Flood Authority area, assess local flood risk, the objectives for managing that risk and measures proposed to implement those objectives. 

     The Local Flood Risk Management Strategy provides Bradford Council’s approach for managing flood risk from all sources throughout the District and has been developed to align with current legislation and guidance. It builds on work that has already been undertaken to assess the risk of flooding in the district and aims to:-  

    • Ensure increased understanding of local flood risk to enable investment in flood management activities to be appropriately prioritised. 

    • Engage and enable all Risk Management Authorities, residents, communities and businesses to manage flood risk in partnership. 

    • Ensure emergency plans and responses to flood incidents are effective and communities are facilitated to recover quickly and effectively after flood events. 

    • Guide local spatial planning and prevent inappropriate development. 

    It is important that flood risk management activities are targeted effectively. Bradford Council is utilising information from all available sources, including national flood maps, historic records and information shared with other Risk Management Authorities, to increase understanding of district wide flood risk and to effectively prioritise resources. The Local Flood Risk Management Strategy is developed and maintained by Bradford Council. It sets out the Council's objectives and measures for managing local flood risk and aims to guide effective flood risk management activities undertaken by the Risk Management Authorities operating within the District. The Strategy can be viewed at our website by clicking on the following link: 

    https://www.bradford.gov.uk/emergencies/flooding/flood-risk-management/

     

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    What are Bradford Council going to do for the young people of Keighley, and to capitalise on the town's potential for tourism? My question is based on my experience of life in the town of Keighley as an 'oftcumden' of nearly 3 years. I like living in Keighley because it is a friendly town and has a good range of shops, a cinema, a Library, the Playhouse, a Music Centre, The Exchange, Victoria Hall, The Leisure Centre, Central Hall, Keighley Healthy Living and Temple Row Centres for community activities. Cliffe Castle is fantastic, with historical talks and musical events, and as a leisure facility, especially now the Pavilion café has been relaunched under brilliant new management. The KWVR is a great heritage and an asset in attracting people to the town. There's plenty to do and enjoy, and I don't understand why I often read such derogatory comments about the town in social media contexts, mainly based on its infiltration by drug dealers and the negative impact that has on the town's young people. I'm not sure what's available to teenagers in the way of safe, affordable, social activities/clubs in the evenings, and I'm aware that many cuts from Central Government have led to many services being curtailed. However I think this is an area which urgently needs attention, as young people seem to hang around aimlessly around the bus station after the Airedale Centre closes, and also at Long Lee Village Hall which has suffered a lot of vandalism. I think the old mills going to rot in the town could be rehabilitated to provide affordable accommodation for those with low incomes. It seems such a shame to let those lovely old buildings stay empty and unused until they need to be demolished when there is a shortage of housing. I also think Keighley is a great town for walkers, both from the town itself, and using the public transport links to the many beauty spots around, especially to the Dales. What is needed in the town is some sort of backpackers' hostel, like a YHA hostel, providing cheap, flexible accommodation for walkers, who would benefit from the bus and train networks; and use the many food outlets, restaurants, and cafés in the town bringing much needed funds to local businesses. Finally, I think the green space opposite the Library should be preserved as a refreshing place for people to relax, and where children can play - perhaps even with some playground equipment - and a space for outside gym equipment. It's already made that area of town so much nicer, and doesn't need to be filled with yet another building.

    Cora asked 5 months ago

    Bradford Council and Young People in Keighley

    Bradford Council’s Cultural Service has and will continue to engage with young people across Keighley.

    There has been various activities in Keighley including ‘THE LEAP’ a new Creative People and Places programme for Bradford District that identified Creative People and Places.  This was aimed to engage more people including younger people in arts and culture by involving them to participate and help shape what’s on offer in their Town.

    There were 24 funded projects that would have appealed to young people and the majority were delivered online and were available to young people in Keighley. 

    Corner House Collective in Keighley, provided online music which involved young people.

    More recent support given to Keighley Creative includes the following:-

    • Keighley Creative Space (KCS) which has developed over the last 18 months from being a building that hosts artists’ studios to a community arts hub for the Keighley area. This is now has a key co-ordination role across the various arts, culture and creative industries in the town. 

    • The Cultural Service coordinated and delivered the very first Keighley Arts and Film Festival which generated significant public participation and brought in substantial external funding for various arts and creative activities and events from bodies such as the Arts Council England and various Lottery funds. 

    • In 2019 funds were secured from Arts Council England to build and open a gallery space in the building, both to show a range of community and professional arts forms, sculpture and photography, but also to host events such as a Maker’s Markets, a regular Spoken Worth night (open mike poetry and prose) and to show short films made by local film makers in our small in-house cinema. 

    • Three of the studio holders have now expanded their role to host public, community and school groups as part of expanding interest and skills in the arts. This includes Life Drawing open access classes. 

    Bradford2025 City of Culture Bid will also link to Keighley and young people.

    Outdoor Spaces

    Bradford Council is also committed to providing good quality sports and play facilities for the young people of the district.

    The Council are currently working with partners on the delivery of the playing pitch strategy and the playable spaces strategy. Both have identified exciting projects in the Keighley area. 

    Marley Athletics and Coaching Centre is in line for a new all weather pitch and investment in the sports hall and facilities.  Devonshire Park has been identified for investment in its play area to provide a new and exciting play area.

    Further to that The Council are looking to invest in play areas across the rest of the Keighley District to provide up to date safe and exciting play facilities. 

    The Council are also working with Keighley Albion Amateur Rugby League club on a new development that hopefully will allow the club to come back into the town and provide training and match rugby for all age groups.

    Tourism in Keighley

    Visit Bradford, the Councils Tourism Service actively promotes Keighley as a destination and links it into Bronte Country.

    Keighley is included in the official Visitor Guide to the District and on visitbradford.com.  https://www.visitbradford.com/default.aspx

    Keighley features in the attractions and highlights and promotes Cliffe Castle Museum, which is managed by Bradford Council, KWVR and East Riddlesdon Hall.

    Keighley is also listed in the Live Music section, Cinemas, the filming of The Railway Children, Retail Destinations and Independent shops, Parks and Green Spaces, Instagram Ready Spots, Cycling, Events, Traveland the Itineraries section.

    Accommodation in Keighley is also promoted.

    Tourism across the Bradford District is estimated to have been around £696.3 million and supports an estimated 14,882 Jobs


  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    How do I use these links? I've just tried to add my comments, but the post buttons didn't work. I noticed that there were several likes but mostly no comments, and that the last activity on all of them was two months ago, even though I got the email encouraging me to contribute only yesterday.

    Ed asked 5 months ago

    Thank you for bringing this matter to our attention.  

    We are currently working with the technical team to resolve the matter and hope to have an answer for you shortly.  We apologise for the delay but we launched our site and then had to pause it for a some weeks due to the Covid-19 crisis.

     

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    I moved to this area two years ago. Since then, I've heard so much about the Shipley by-pass. However, nothing seems to be happening about it and I'm starting to think it's an urban myth. Can you tell me a) the exact proposed route and b) where you are in the planning stage (I realised the Dept of Transport may well be involved in this)

    Dona St. Columb asked 5 months ago

    Thank you for your email. 

    The Shipley Eastern Scheme has been in consideration since around 2004. Various iterations of potential options have been discussed during this period and the current development works we are undertaking takes into account findings to date and looks to develop a number of proposals for further review. The scheme is funded directly from the Department of Transport with whom we are working very closely.

     The Shipley Eastern Congestion Relief Scheme is currently being reviewed by our appointed consultant. At this stage we are considering potential options which will ease / improve traffic flows around the Shipley area. This involves desk top studies, reviewing traffic flows, considering other schemes in the area and the likely costs for potential schemes. We are very early in the development process but works are progressing as planned. We hope to be in a position towards the end of this calendar year to provide an update to the public as to next steps and possible timescales.

     

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    How can we become carbon neutral by 2040?

    Christine asked 8 months ago

    Thanks for your question.

    Bradford Council is working towards eliminating harmful greenhouse gas emissions both for the organisation and district, with partners and citizens. We are directly  working with the other  West Yorkshire Councils and the West Yorkshire Combined Authority to collaborate on large scale transformation especially for buildings, power, land and agriculture, industry and business and transport.

    There is a dedicated research project underway to support these efforts due to report  in Summer 2020, which will set out clearer pathways and options for key emissions reduction to 2038. This is the Leeds City Region Climate coalition pledge and target to be a  ‘net zero city-region’ with significant progress by 2030. 

    We are working to ensure that adaptation and environmental resilience, including flood, heatwave preparedness and alleviation, are also considered alongside other environmental and well-being  issues.

    A report was considered by Bradford Council’s Executive on the 24th March 2020 and this included an initial sustainable development action plan. Addressing these issues is a critical matter not just for the Council and public sector, but collectively for business, communities, voluntary organisations and citizens.

    Planning and delivery may be postponed or reshaped  in the face of the response and recovery to the Coronavirus impacts and containment.  Please bear with us as this work develops during 2020-21.

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    Public transport in Bradford is not very good - infrequent, especially off-peak, and too costly. No wonder so many people drive instead, despite public transport being better for the environment. How EXACTLY will you improve public transport? Please be specific - I don't want a wishy washy answer.

    K de Souza asked 8 months ago

    Many thanks for your question. Before answering we’d just like to acknowledge the fantastic job that transport workers across the District are doing at the moment to keep the place on the move, and help our key workers get where they need to be.

    Public transport provision in Bradford is relatively good when compared with other British cities of a similar size. In many cases communities are served with frequent bus routes, and bus and rail fares are kept lower within West Yorkshire than they are in areas which are not covered by a Combined Authority such as West Yorkshire Combined Authority (WYCA). Frequencies during the day are generally consistent. However, evening frequencies are lower than would be ideal, and there is a trend in Bradford to less rather than more use of public transport. We do recognise that there needs to be significant improvement in public transport provision and fares in order to encourage more people to travel sustainably without a car.

    There are a number of ways in which public transport can be improved and the Council is responsible for some of these.

    • The Government and the Department for Transport in particular is responsible for the overall public funding levels and regulatory frameworks for public transport, which is met with private investment from bus and rail companies.

    • Transport for the North (TfN) is responsible for strategic planning and is working on a pan-Northern approach to ticketing as well as major strategic transport projects including Northern Powerhouse Rail.

    • The West Yorkshire Combined Authority receives a precept from the Council to invest in subsidised bus services across the District, and works to maintain the structure of the network, bus station and bus stop infrastructure, integrated ticketing and public-facing image.

    • Rail and bus companies are responsible for the running of their own services and can carry out improvements independently of Council involvement, such as purchasing newer vehicles, adjusting fare levels or improving frequencies.

    • The Council is principally responsible for the highways element of the public transport network, while also playing a large role in planning for public transport infrastructure and integrating projects by different partners.


    The Council is developing policy through its Local Plan (Core Strategy  Partial Review) and emerging Transport Strategy  which will address public transport improvements in more detail. There are a number of on-going work-streams which are aimed at improving public transport in Bradford District:

    • Monitoring Rail Franchises through TfN and WYCA to ensure they deliver their planned commitments, to improve rail services from Bradford Interchange in particular.

    • Rail companies are introducing new rolling stock to improve the passenger experience and replace outdated trains. Northern is introducing its new CAF Civity trains on routes to Bradford Interchange, Bradford Forster Square, Keighley and Ilkley. LNER is introducing its new Azuma trains to Bradford Forster Square, Shipley and Keighley.

    • WYCA and Network Rail have over the past 5 years opened 2 new rail stations at Apperley Bridge and Low Moor giving many more people direct access to the rail network.

    • The Council and WYCA are working hard to secure a new higher speed railway line between Manchester and Leeds to serve Bradford City Centre, known as Northern Powerhouse Rail (NPR).

    • Masterplanning has commenced for Bradford centred on the new NPR station following government funding to the tune of £500,000 which will explore how this opportunity can achieve the greatest benefit to public transport from this investment (see https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/west-yorkshire-devolution-deal).

    • The Council is working with WYCA to build the case for West Yorkshire Mass Transit to vastly improve the quality of public transport on some routes including in Bradford district (see https://www.westyorks-ca.gov.uk/improving-transport/urban-transit/). We will be working hard to ensure that this is integrated with other public transport in the area and connects tocommunities and future development.

    • WYCA is working towards One System Public Transport that seamlessly connects different modes of transport, planned to work together as a system (see the West Yorkshire Transport 2040 https://www.westyorks-ca.gov.uk/media/2379/transport-strategy-2040.pdf). The plan has concrete targets to increase bus use by 25% and rail use by 75% by 2027.

    • The West Yorkshire Bus Alliance (see https://www.westyorks-ca.gov.uk/improving-transport/west-yorkshire-bus-alliance/) brings the Council, WYCA and Bus Operators together to improve bus services.

      • Key themes being worked on through the West Yorkshire Bus Alliance are Ticketing and Affordability, Customer Service, Clean Bus Technology and Travel Information, The Network, Highway Infrastructure as well as Travel Information, Communication and Engagement.

      • The initiative has secured cheaper fares for young people and a number of journey guarantees to encourage bus travel.

      • There is investment on-going to install new information screens at bus stops across West Yorkshire including Bradford.

      • The Council has funding to progress some highways interventions to improve operating conditions for buses, such as changes to junction and bus stop layouts.

      • The Alliance lasts until 2022

    • From May 2021, West Yorkshire is planned to become a Mayoral Combined Authority, giving it access to the Devolution funds to address public transport integration. It would also gain access to franchising powers for bus services, to enable better coordination and accountability for public transport.

    • The Council is working to secure funds made available through the Better Deal for Bus Users fund (see https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/a-better-deal-for-bus-users/a-better-deal-for-bus-users) to work towards improvements in the District.


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    How can we make sure that children with learning disabilities get the education and support that they need?

    Christine asked 8 months ago

    Thanks for your question.

    Children’s Services have a SEND Strategy which has been developed with parents, carers and young people with SEND. This can be located on the Local Offer website. The Strategy has recently been revised and runs to 2022. We are committed to reviewing it annually so we can continue to drive the improvements needed and respond to the needs of children and their families in the longer term.

    We also have a Local Area SEND Strategic Partnership Board in place with representatives from Education, Health and Social Care, which oversees the education and support provided to our vulnerable children and young people. In addition, our school place planning and sufficiency strategy ensures that we have enough specialist school places across the District to meet the needs of children and young people with SEND.  

    Our approach to developing the 2040 Vision involves listening to the views of people across the District. We will be reaching out to young people as a priority, and maximising opportunities for young people and those with learning disabilities to contribute.

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    Why don't you ask people to write down which places they value; it would be simpler for the computer illiterate and as simple for the computer literate. I value Keighley’s Carnegie Library and all the other heritage buildings in Keighley and the Bradford District. I regard the demolition of many of these old buildings as firstly, municipal vandalism and secondly, hugely contributory to climate change; concrete is the third greatest source of global warming.

    Janeleewomack67@gmail.com asked 7 months ago

    Thanks for your question. We are seeking views from people in a variety of ways, and are looking to make it as easy and inclusive as possible. We've already started to hear from people across the District through events and focus groups, etc. However, all our face-to-face activities are currently on hold, in line with government guidance on Covid-19. We will be re-starting our activities as soon as possible, but in the meantime we'd love to hear more from people online.